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12 November 1720

Norwegian Vice Admiral Peter Wessel Tordenskiold was killed in a duel at Hildesheim in Germany. The occasion was a quarrel in which Tordenskiold accused Jacob Axel Stael von Holstein, a colonel who had been in Swedish service, to trick people for... Read more ...

12 November 1720

Tordenskiold was killed
Norwegian Vice Admiral Peter Wessel Tordenskiold was killed in a duel at Hildesheim in Germany. The occasion was a quarrel in which Tordenskiold accused Jacob Axel Stael von Holstein, a colonel who had been in Swedish service, to trick people for money. The dispute ended in scuffles and Tordenskiold beat up the ten years older Staël von Holstein. Stael tried to pull the sword, but was unable to get it out of its sheath. Tordenskiold used it instead to beat him up. The injured von Holstein demanded redress through a duel.

At five o'clock in the morning of 12 November Tordenskiold was summoned by his second, named Münnichhausen – whom Tordenskiold had never met. It was predetermined that the duel would be fought with guns, but Münnichhausen told Tordenskiold that the duel was cancelled because von Holstein had traveled to Hamburg. Münnichhausen convinced Tordenskiold that for formal reasons he had to show up at the agreed site of the duel instead, but that there was no need to carry a gun.

When they arrived von Holstein was present and ready to fight. Since Tordenskiold had arrived without pistols, it was decided to fight with sword instead. Stael von Holstein was better armed with a long ‘karolinerverge’ while Tordenskiold just had a small parade sword. During the duel Tordenskiold was hit by a powerful thrust that went in under his arm and hit the spine. Mortally wounded, he died after a few minutes, just 30 years old.


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    Make your own drop tube stand

    Category: Miscellaneous
    Published: 7 September 2014 by Øyvind Flatnes.
    Views: 7214
    Les artikkel på norsk

    The video shows the three different methods for compressing black powder, as well as how you can make a drop tube stand.

    A drop tube is used for compressing black powder loads.

    A drop tube is used for compressing black powder loads.

    The drawing shows how a stand can be made.

    The drawing shows how a stand can be made.

    The difference between a compressed (right) and not compressed load.

    The difference between a compressed (right) and not compressed charge.

    Alternatively you can make one of these stands.

    Alternatively you can make one of these stands.

    In order to load match-grade black powder cartridges it is important to compress the powder. This allows for more powder in the case, as well as improved combustion and accuracy. There are several methods for compressing black powder, but pouring the powder through a long drop tube is one of the simplest and best methods – especially if you mechanically compress it afterwards. This article shows how you can make a sturdy drop tube stand with simple tools.

    To make a drop tube stand you need a couple of wood boards and two eye screws, in addition to a saw, a hand drill and files. The eyes of the screw must be large enough to accept the drop tube.

    As seen from the drawing, one of the boards is made into a drop tube holder, while the other serves as a base. You can of course glue or otherwise fix the two parts together, but you save storage space by dismantling the stand after use. The two parts are fitted together through a rectangular opening in the bas the matches the drop tube holder.

    The drop tube holder is approximately 13in high. A bevel edge allows you to remove cases without bumping into the stand and also makes room for a loading block. Make the bottom end rectangular. This piece will later be fitted into the base. The height of the shape is identical to the height of the base.

    Screw the eye screws into the front of the drop tube holder; one at the top and one just before the bevel. To prevent the wood from cracking, pre-drill holes before mounting the screws.

    The base is simply a rectangular shaped piece of wood. Make sure it is perfectly level. Draw the outline of the drop tube holder's base. To make the rectangular opening, use a drill and mill out as much wood as you can before finishing the shape with a file.

    The drop tube stand is now practically done. Find a drop tube and insert it through the eye screws.

    To adjust the height of the tube, thread an O-ring on the tube and rest it against the uppermost eye screw. A rubber band or similar does the job as well.

    I use a loading tube from Pedersoli that I use for loading muzzle-loading rifles. Similar tubes can be made from copper, aluminum, brass or similar. To avoid powder spillage the tube should have a funnel at the top.

    Download illustrated instructions here. The measurements are not critical, but make sure the stand is stable.

    But does this method work? Yes, it does! Take a look at the picture to the right that shows two identical 70 grain loads of Swiss #4. The load to the left is weighed and poured directly from the weight into the vial, while the load to the left is weighed and dropped through and 28in (63.5 cm) drop tube. The difference is approximately 0.5mm/.020 in. The vial is .40in/10.16mm in diameter.