Forum

Market


On this day

28 October 1834

The Pinjarra Massacre was an attack that occurred at Pinjarra, Western Australia on a group of up to 80 Noongar people by a detachment of 25 soldiers, police and settlers led by Governor James Stirling in 1834. After attacks on the displaced Swan... Read more ...

28 October 1834

The Pinjarra Massacre
The Pinjarra Massacre was an attack that occurred at Pinjarra, Western Australia on a group of up to 80 Noongar people by a detachment of 25 soldiers, police and settlers led by Governor James Stirling in 1834. After attacks on the displaced Swan River Whadjuk people and depredations on settlers by a group of the Binjareb people led by Calyute had, according to European settlers, reached unacceptable levels, culminating in the payback killing of an ex-soldier, Stirling led his force after the party.

Arriving at their camp, five members of the pursuit party were sent into the camp to arrest the suspects and the Aborigines resisted. In the ensuing melee, Stirling reported 15 killed (eleven names were collected later from Aboriginal sources); police superintendent T.T. Ellis later died of wounds and a soldier was wounded. Stirling warned the tribe against payback killings and arranged a peace between the warring tribes, but Calyute continued to break it by raiding the Whadjuk until his demise.


Chat

Offline

No chatting right now.

    (You must be logged in to the forum to chat.)


    Featured article

      Muzzleloader and Patched Roundball

    • Muzzleloader and Patched Roundball

      Many black powder shooters have once in their career shot a rifle or musket loaded with a patched roundball. This article describes how you can load a muzzleloading rifle with a cloth patch and a lead roundball. The article is especially suited for beginners.

    Make your own drop tube stand

    Category: Miscellaneous
    Published: 7 September 2014 by Øyvind Flatnes.
    Views: 10977
    Les artikkel på norsk

    The video shows the three different methods for compressing black powder, as well as how you can make a drop tube stand.

    A drop tube is used for compressing black powder loads.

    A drop tube is used for compressing black powder loads.

    The drawing shows how a stand can be made.

    The drawing shows how a stand can be made.

    The difference between a compressed (right) and not compressed load.

    The difference between a compressed (right) and not compressed charge.

    Alternatively you can make one of these stands.

    Alternatively you can make one of these stands.

    In order to load match-grade black powder cartridges it is important to compress the powder. This allows for more powder in the case, as well as improved combustion and accuracy. There are several methods for compressing black powder, but pouring the powder through a long drop tube is one of the simplest and best methods – especially if you mechanically compress it afterwards. This article shows how you can make a sturdy drop tube stand with simple tools.

    To make a drop tube stand you need a couple of wood boards and two eye screws, in addition to a saw, a hand drill and files. The eyes of the screw must be large enough to accept the drop tube.

    As seen from the drawing, one of the boards is made into a drop tube holder, while the other serves as a base. You can of course glue or otherwise fix the two parts together, but you save storage space by dismantling the stand after use. The two parts are fitted together through a rectangular opening in the bas the matches the drop tube holder.

    The drop tube holder is approximately 13in high. A bevel edge allows you to remove cases without bumping into the stand and also makes room for a loading block. Make the bottom end rectangular. This piece will later be fitted into the base. The height of the shape is identical to the height of the base.

    Screw the eye screws into the front of the drop tube holder; one at the top and one just before the bevel. To prevent the wood from cracking, pre-drill holes before mounting the screws.

    The base is simply a rectangular shaped piece of wood. Make sure it is perfectly level. Draw the outline of the drop tube holder's base. To make the rectangular opening, use a drill and mill out as much wood as you can before finishing the shape with a file.

    The drop tube stand is now practically done. Find a drop tube and insert it through the eye screws.

    To adjust the height of the tube, thread an O-ring on the tube and rest it against the uppermost eye screw. A rubber band or similar does the job as well.

    I use a loading tube from Pedersoli that I use for loading muzzle-loading rifles. Similar tubes can be made from copper, aluminum, brass or similar. To avoid powder spillage the tube should have a funnel at the top.

    Download illustrated instructions here. The measurements are not critical, but make sure the stand is stable.

    But does this method work? Yes, it does! Take a look at the picture to the right that shows two identical 70 grain loads of Swiss #4. The load to the left is weighed and poured directly from the weight into the vial, while the load to the left is weighed and dropped through and 28in (63.5 cm) drop tube. The difference is approximately 0.5mm/.020 in. The vial is .40in/10.16mm in diameter.