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22 September 1866

Slaget ved Curupaity var et av de viktigste slagene under trippelalliansekrigen der Argentina, Brasil og Uruguay kjempet mot Paraguay. Om morgenen den 22. september 1866 angrep alliansen de befestede paraguayanske skyttergravene ved Curupaity.... Read more ...

22 September 1866

Slaget ved Curupaity
Slaget ved Curupaity var et av de viktigste slagene under trippelalliansekrigen der Argentina, Brasil og Uruguay kjempet mot Paraguay.

Om morgenen den 22. september 1866 angrep alliansen de befestede paraguayanske skyttergravene ved Curupaity. Paraguayanerene var under kommando av general José E. Díaz. Posisjonen ble holdt av 5 000 menn og 49 kanoner hvorav noen var gjemt utenfor angriperenes synsfelt.

Den brasilianske marinen ga støtteild til de 20 000 angriperene, men måtte holde avstand på grunn av kanonene på fortet i Humaitá, som da ledet til at beskytningen fra skipene ble unøyaktig og hadde mindre innvirkning. Paraguayanerene klarte i tillegg å lokke den brasilianske beskytningen mot en tom skyttergrav mens de paraguayanske troppene befant seg på et annet sted. Omtrent 20 prosent av de 20 000 allierte troppene falt under slaget mens Paraguay tapte mindre enn 100 menn.


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    Featured article

      Make your own drop tube stand

    • Make your own drop tube stand

      In order to load match-grade black powder cartridges it is important to compress the powder. This allows for more powder in the case, as well as improved combustion and accuracy. This article shows how you can make a sturdy drop tube stand with simple tools.

    Smoothbore Musket and Paper Cartridge

    Category: Muzzle-loading
    Published: 24 November 2007 by Øyvind Flatnes.
    Edited: 24 November 2007.
    Views: 36820

    Brown Bess

    A picture of a target which I shot from the standing position with my Pedersoli .75 cal. Brown Bess carbine loaded with paper cartridges from a distance of 35 yds. The cartridge consisted of a .735" ball dipped in a mixture of deer tallow and bees wax and 90 grs. of 1F powder. You would probably get better results with a patched roundball, but what the heck, I'm satisfied anyway!

    Sometime during the 17th century the armies of the time began to use the paper cartridge for their muskets. Before, the musketeers had used a bandoleer with the desired amount of gunpowder measured beforehand which was kept in a tubular wooden container. This was an inconvenient way to carry the ammunition because the ball had to be kept in a pouch separately from the powder. Loading a musket was by then a time consuming process.

    Find out more!
    You can learn more about the history and use smooth-bore muskets and paper cartridges in the brand new book From Musket to Metallic Cartridge: A Practical History of Black Powder Firearms.

    Loading a Musket with Paper Cartridge

    Muskettpatron

    .75 cal. musket cartridge.

    The first thing you do is to take a paper cartridge that contains a round ball wrapped in paper, black powder and bullet lube. Back then, the bullet end of the cartridge was dipped in melted tallow before the powder was poured into the cartridge. The soldiers used to bite or tear a hole in the cartridge and pour a small amount of powder on the flash pan. This is not recommended to day, obviously because you do not want to load a primed weapon. The weapon was primed first in the old days because you saved time during the operation of loading the musket. Today we don't have enemies charging us when we load. We do as follows: We pour all the powder down the barrel. Then the cartridge is reversed and placed with the bullet end down it is rammed down the barrel.

    Brown Bess Brown Bess Brown Bess

    The greased paper around the ball will work as some sort of crude patching. I have experienced that if the excess paper is torn away (all the paper that isn't greased) accuracy will be best.

    Brown Bess Brown Bess Brown Bess

    Now we can prime our musket. I normally use 4F for this, but I have also tried 3F, 2F and even 1F powder. The musket will ignite with all of them, but the coarser the priming powder is, the slower the ignition time will be.

    Brown Bess

    BANG!