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7 December 1776

Gilbert you Motier, Marquis de La Fayette, decided to join the US Army. He became convinced that the American cause in its revolutionary war was noble, and travelled to the New World seeking glory in it. There, he was made a major general, though... Read more ...

7 December 1776

Marquis de Lafayette joined the US Army
Gilbert you Motier, Marquis de La Fayette, decided to join the US Army. He became convinced that the American cause in its revolutionary war was noble, and travelled to the New World seeking glory in it. There, he was made a major general, though initially the 19-year-old was not given troops to command. Wounded during the Battle of Brandywine, he still managed to organize an orderly retreat. He served with distinction in the Battle of Rhode Island. In the middle of the war, he returned home to lobby for an increase in French support. He again sailed to America in 1780, and was given senior positions in the Continental Army. In 1781, troops in Virginia under his command blocked forces led by Cornwallis until other American and French forces could position themselves for the decisive Siege of Yorktown.

Lafayette returned to France and, in 1787. After the storming of the Bastille, Lafayette was appointed commander-in-chief of the National Guard, and tried to steer a middle course through the French Revolution. In August 1792, the radical factions ordered his arrest. Fleeing through the Austrian Netherlands, he was captured by Austrian troops and spent more than five years in prison.

Lafayette returned to France after Napoleon Bonaparte secured his release in 1797. Lafayette died on 20 May 1834, and is buried in Picpus Cemetery in Paris, under soil from Bunker Hill. For his accomplishments in the service of both France and the United States, he is sometimes known as "The Hero of the Two Worlds".

Han døde i 1834, 76 år gammel.


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      Hunting with Black Powder Weapons

    • Hunting with Black Powder Weapons

      In this article you can read about hunting with black powder firearms, from a Norwegian perspective. The Norwegian game law limits the use of black powder for hunting, but a few hunters hunt small game with black powder rifles and shotguns. Read the article to find out more.

    Exploded View of a Flintlock Musket

    Category: Miscellaneous
    Published: 15 November 2008 by Øyvind Flatnes.
    Views: 14824
    Les artikkel på norsk

    The smoothbore military flintlock musket was the standard infantry firearm for hundreds of years before the percussion muskets and breech-loading rifles took over from the mid-1850s. The Norwegian Army received muskets from Denmark during the union years, but after the union with Denmark fell apart and another union was established with Sweden in 1814, the Norwegians started their own firearms production at Kongsberg. A typical Norwegian-Danish musket looked like this:

    Musket parts

    1. Butt
    2. Wrist
    3. Comb
    4. Heel
    5. Butt plate with screws
    6. Toe
    7. Trigger guard
    8. Flint lock
    9. Barrel breech
    10. Ramrod
    11. Front sling swivel with screw
    12. Thimble
    13. Thimble pins
    14. Entry thimble
    15. Muzzle
    16. Front sight
    17. Bayonet lug
    18. Ear for the sling swivel screw
    19. Double ear — pin ear — for securing the thimbles
    20. Single ear- pin ear - for securing the barrel to the stock
    21. Flash hole
    22. Rear sight notch
    23. Tang
    24. Breech plug
    25. Barrel
    26. Rear sling swivel with screw
    27. Ramrod stopper
    28. Trigger
    29. Trigger guard screws
    30. Trigger assembly
    31. Bayonet socket
    32. Elbow
    33. Bayonet lug slot
    34. Shoulder
    35. Triangular blade
    36. Front side plate screw
    37. Rear side plate screw
    38. Side plate
    39. Muzzle cap
    40. Tang screw
    41. Brake spring for the ramrod
    42. Back of the thimble
    43. Butt nose
    44. Barrel pin
    45. Butt nose
    46. Fore-stock
    47. Cheek piece
    48. Breech plug

    Find out more!
    You can learn more about the history and practical use of smooth-bore flintlock and percussion muskets in the brand new book From Musket to Metallic Cartridge: A Practical History of Black Powder Firearms.